Three Ways in Which the Law Tends to be Subjective

It is often asserted that the law is subjective. And as we come to learn, there are actually some three ways in which the law tends to be subjective.

The first way in which the law tends to be subjective is to the extent that it tends to favor the party with more power, in any given situation.

The second way in which the law tends to be subjective is to the extent that it can be interpreted in various ways, depending on the inclinations and interests of the people doing the interpretation.

The third way in which the law tends to be subjective is to the extent that it can be applied in diverse ways, again depending on the inclinations and interests of the people doing the application. So this is where we end up with the same law being applied differently to different parties.

There are journals you can subscribe to, to learn more about the subjectivity and other peculiarities of the law. Some of these journals are free of charge: to get them, you probably only need to provide your email account (which is where they’d subsequently be sent). And if you have no email account, you can go to, among other places, gmailsignincom.com for elaborate www.gmail.com sign up instructions.

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